Don’t Miss Locally Sauced

You may have seen our recent State of the Market update. Things are looking up, but we know we need to shore up and store up (money) for the winter season. You can help and have a blast by attending Locally Sauced….

A delicious experience for a good cause!

Little Rock Locally Sauced Farmer’s Market Fundraiser

Proceeds to benefit the Arkansas Local Food Network

Little Rock— August 12, 2019— On September 7th, 2019 the Arkansas Local Food Network (ALFN), an online farmer’s market that promotes Arkansas farms and cottage industries while bringing the best of local produce to the public, will host, Locally Sauced, unique and saucy fundraiser.

The Locally Sauced event will celebrate a variety of sweet and savory condiments while exploring the intersection between staple foods, in-season ingredients and delicious sauces and dips.  The highlight of the event will be a series of stations where attendees sample sweet and savory sauces created with pantry staples and local ingredients.  Each station will feature a basic sauce (hummus, pesto, vinaigrette, cream-style dressing, chutney, fruit compote, etc.) and provide a recipe card that outlines the basic formula to make the featured sauce or dressing.  The station will also display a variety of local ingredients that can be used to make creative variations of the sauce.  Every participant will have a good time, and leave empowered to buy local and get creative making sauces from scratch in their own kitchen.

Attendees who come to learn how to make sauces with local ingredients will enjoy heavy appetizers, drinks (cocktails and mocktails), and desserts. The ALFN is a 501c(3) non-profit organization, and can provide a tax-deductible receipt for any donation, large or small.  Many local farms and businesses, including The Root Café, Community Bakery, Kornegay Farms, April’s Family Kitchen, Green Acres organic farm, Arkansas Natural Produce and more will support the event by contributing appetizers, sweet treats and local ingredients. Local sauces and products will be available for purchase.

Please join us at this great food experience – It’s sure to be a good time.

For over ten years, the Arkansas Local Food Network (ALFN), has worked to promote strong Arkansas farms and access to fresh local food in Central Arkansas. ALFN is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. For more information visit GoALFN.com, call 501-398-1573, or email ARLocalFoodNetwork@gmail.com.

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ARE PICKLES HEALTHY TO EAT?

Cucumbers are staples in the average American diet, with large cucumbers typically eaten raw and small cucumbers pickled for long-term storage. Even though pickles are made from cucumber, they differ slightly from raw cucumber with respect to their nutrient content. Pickles generally offer more vitamins and fiber than cucumber but also contain sugar or sodium that lowers their nutritional value.

Calories and Fiber

Cucumbers and dill pickles are both low in calories — a cup of sliced cucumber contains 16 calories, while an equivalent serving of dill pickles contains 19. Sweet pickles are higher in calories, at 139 calories per cup because of their sugar content. Reaching for either cucumbers or pickles boosts your fiber intake. This fiber helps speed the movement of food through your digestive tract, combating constipation, and also helps reduce the level of cholesterol in your bloodstream. A 1-cup serving of sliced cucumber provides 0.5 grams of fiber, while dill pickles offer 1.7 grams of fiber per cup and sweet pickles provide 1.5 grams of fiber.

Vitamin K Content

Pickles offer more vitamin K per serving than cucumber. Your body uses vitamin K to activate enzymes responsible for cell growth and development, as well as bone and cartilage health. It also plays a central role in blood coagulation, which protects against blood loss. A 1-cup serving of sweet pickles contains 72.1 micrograms of vitamin K — 58 percent of the recommended daily vitamin K intake for men and 80 percent for women. An equivalent serving of sliced cucumber provides 17.1 micrograms of vitamin K, while a cup of dill pickles offers 60.4 micrograms.

Vitamin A Content

Reach for pickles over cucumber as a source of vitamin A. Sweet pickles, in particular, come loaded with vitamin A. Each cup provides 1,169 international units of vitamin A, which is 39 percent of the daily vitamin A needs for men and 50 percent for women. A cup of sliced dill pickles offers 284 international units of vitamin A, while cucumbers contain 109 international units per cup. The vitamin A abundant in pickles aids in the development of new blood cells, regulates thyroid gland function and supports healthy vision.

Sodium and Sugar Content

Cucumbers offer major health advantages over pickles because they’re naturally low in sugar and sodium. Each cup of sliced cucumber contains just 1.7 grams of naturally occurring sugar and 2 milligrams of sodium — less than 1 percent of your daily sodium limit. Dill pickles, on the other hand, contain a whopping 1,356 milligrams of sodium per serving, or 59 percent of your daily limit. A a result, you should limit your dill pickle intake, or you risk the high blood pressure and heart disease associated with a high-sodium diet. Sweet pickles are also high in sodium, at 699 milligrams per cup, and also contain 28 grams of sugar per serving. This sugar offers no nutritional value but boosts your calorie intake and contributes to tooth decay.

Beetroot — Super Food

Beetroot, also known as beet, has been gaining in popularity as a new super food due to recent studies claiming that beets and beetroot juice can improve athletic performance, lower blood pressure, and increase blood flow.

Benefits

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Beetroot has been gaining in popularity as a new super food.

Consuming fruits and vegetables of all kinds has long been associated with a reduced risk of many lifestyle-related health conditions.

Many studies indicate that eating more plant foods, like beetroot, decreases the risk of obesity, overall mortality, diabetes, and heart disease and promotes a healthy complexion and hair, increased energy, and overall lower weight.

Dementia: Researchers at Wake Forest University have found that drinking juice from beetroot can improve oxygenation to the brain, slowing the progression of dementia in older adults.

Studies on alpha-lipoic acid have also shown a decrease in symptoms of peripheral neuropathy and autonomic neuropathy in people with diabetes.

Diabetes: Beets contain an antioxidant known as alpha-lipoic acid, which may help lower glucose levels, increase insulin sensitivity and prevent oxidative stress-induced changes in patients with diabetes.

Digestion and regularity: Because of its high fiber content, beetroot helps to prevent constipation and promote regularity for a healthy digestive tract.

Inflammation: Choline is a very important and versatile nutrient in beetroot that helps with sleep, muscle movement, learning, and memory. Choline also helps to maintain the structure of cellular membranes, aids in the transmission of nerve impulses, assists in the absorption of fat and reduces chronic inflammation.

BeetsBeets, boiled

Amount Per 1 beet (2″ dia) (82 g)100 grams1 cup (136 g)1 cup (136 g)
Calories 59
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.2 g0%
Saturated fat 0 g0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g
Monounsaturated fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg0%
Sodium 106 mg4%
Potassium 442 mg12%
Total Carbohydrate 13 g4%
Dietary fiber 3.8 g15%
Sugar 9 g
Protein 2.2 g4%
Vitamin A0%Vitamin C11%
Calcium2%Iron6%
Vitamin D0%Vitamin B-65%
Cobalamin0%Magnesium7%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Red Russian Kale

Kale

Its sweet flavor is particularly pronounced as a baby leaf, but that sweetness remains even at full maturity. Its long stems are reddish-purple with flat, toothed, dark green leaves, and is surprisingly tender.

RED RUSSIAN KALE WITH GARLIC AND LEMON 

PREP TIME 10 mins – COOK TIME 15 mins – TOTAL TIME 25 mins 

Serves: 4 servings

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 large bunch of red Russian kale, washed, stems removed and roughly chopped
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 5 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • ½ cup water
  • Juice of half a lemon

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add garlic and sauté for about a minute or until it turns just golden.
  2. Add kale and stir until kale is fully coated with oil. Add salt, pepper and water. Cover and cook for about 10 minutes or until kale is soft and tender. Adjust seasonings and drizzle with lemon juice.
  3. Serve with your favorite meat.

You can order Red Russian Kale at the Arkansas Local Food Network from Arkansas Natural Produce.

Edible Flowers are the New Rage

After falling out of favor for many years, cooking and garnishing with flowers is back in vogue once again.  Flower cookery has been traced back to Roman times, and to the Chinese, Middle Eastern, and Indian cultures.  Edible flowers were especially popular in the Victorian era during Queen Victoria’s reign.

You can find edible flowers right here in Arkansas!!!

Arkansas Natural Produce: Malvern, AR

We have a year-round greenhouse facility that specializes in salad greens, with other vegetables in season. We use natural farming practices and have been in business since 1988. No synthetic fertilizers, pesticides or preservatives are used in the growing or packaging of our products.


This is our blend of edible flowers. They will include nasturtiums (which actually taste good) and other flowers to garnish your salads, entrees and desserts for those special occasions when an extra splash of color would be perfect for your dinner party.


Arkansas Dessert: Peaches, Pecans, & Honey

0EDB4F20-5A1A-43B6-B345-AD055F0D38EFWhat’s better than Arkansas peaches, spiced Arkansas pecans, and Arkansas honey? Well…nothing really! Grab them from our online market before they’re gone, and try out this delicious recipe from Woman & Home:

Ingredients:
4 peaches, halves and stones removed
4 TBS butter
2 TBS honey
A handful of spiced pecans

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Place the peaches cut side up on a baking sheet, and place half a tablespoon of better in the center of each peach
  • Drizzle honey over peaches
  • Crush pecans and scatter over peaches
  • Roast for 10-15 minutes. Try serving with creme fraiche or ice cream!

Deciphering Labels: Certified Naturally Grown vs. Certified Organic

In today’s world, figuring out what a food label actually means is no easy task. Marketers are savvy to our desire to be as healthy and environmentally conscious as possible, and their packaging has a way to skirting around the truth in order to sell that message.

Shopping at a Farmers Markets can reduce the mental aerobics that happen at the supermarket. Growers from the farm are right there to answer your questions, and their labeling isn’t crowded with hyperbole and a grab-bag of health claims. Two common labels that you will see at a farmers market are the USDA’s “Certified Naturally Grown” and “Certified Organic”. What exactly do these labels mean?

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Let’s begin with what came first: Certified Organic. The National Organic Program is the federal agency that administers the USDA organic certification, and was created in 2000.  To become Certified Organic, a farmer cannot grow using anything from the National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances (mandated by the Secretary of Agriculture). Prohibited substances include most synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, and when a synthetic substance is used for a specific purpose, it must be approved on criteria that examines its effect on human health and the environment. Getting a Certified Organic seal can take several years of advance preparation – standards state that organic crops must be grown on land that has been free from prohibited pesticides, herbicides, and synthetic fertilizers for three years proceeding growth. After a farm has completed the requirements and a National Organic Program agent has made a site visit and filed a favorable report, maintaining the certification is an ongoing process that requires daily record keeping and data collection. The cost to becoming certified organic varies substantially by which certifying agent you choose (dependent on location), and can be as much as $1,500 per farm.

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For many small farmers, the cost and paperwork required to received a certified organic label is prohibitive and cost-ineffective. That’s why a group of farmers created the the Certified Naturally Grown certification organization, the “grassroots alternative to certified organic”. The CNG label is no less strict in it’s requirements than Certified organic – all produce must still be grown without synthetic herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers, antibiotics, hormones, or genetically modified organisms. Certified Naturally Grown farmers are required to submit to an annual inspection and pay an annual fee. In contrast with the NOP, where inspections are conducted by a USDA-accredited certifying agency and third-party inspectors, CNG farms may be inspected by other CNG farmers, non-CNG farmers, extension agents, master gardeners and customers, with CNG farmers being ideal.

So next time you’re shopping for produce online or at the farmers market and see a lack of “certified organic” growers, don’t be discouraged! Ask instead if a vendor is certified naturally grown. These practices still produce food that is safe and delicious to eat. Stay tuned for the launch of our new website – you will be able to sort vendors by their certification!